Disappearing Posts / Financing / Rust

1984

While in negotiations I have removed a few older posts temporarily. The “Adding Secure, Authenticated HTTPS Interop to a C(++) Project” series, for instance.

I can’t make the time to focus on it at the moment and don’t want it to sit like a bad promise while the conclusion awaits (and for technical pieces I really try to ensure 100% accuracy which is time consuming), and will republish when I can finish it. I note this given a few comments where helpful readers thought some sort of data corruption or transactional rollback was afoot. All is good.

Rust

Occasionally I write things on here that lead some to inaccurately extrapolate more about my position. In a recent post, for instance, I noted that Rust (the system language) seems to be used more for advocacy — particularly of the “my big brother is tougher than your big brother” anti-Go sort — than in creating actual solutions.

chain-109302_640
This wasn’t a criticism of Rust. So I was a bit surprising when I was asked to write a “Why Go demolishes Rust” article (paraphrasing, but that was the intent) for a technical magazine.

I don’t think Go demolishes Rust. Rust is actually a very exciting, well considered, modern language. It’s a bit young at the moment, but has gotten over the rapid changes that occurred earlier in its lifecycle.

Language tourism is a great pursuit for all developers. Not only do we learn new tools that might be useful in our pursuits, at a minimum we’ll look at the languages we do use and leverage daily in a different way, often learning and understanding their design compromises and benefits through comparison.

I would absolutely recommend that everyone give Rust a spin. The tutorials are very simple, the feedback fast and rewarding.

Selling Abilities

When selling oneself, particularly in an entrepreneurial effort where you’re the foundation of the exercise and your abilities are key, you can’t leverage social lies like contrived self-deprecation or restraint. It’s pretty much a given that you have to be assertive and confident in your abilities, because that’s ultimately what you’re selling to people.

This doesn’t mean claims of infallibility. Instead that you have a good understanding of what you are capable of doing based upon empirical evidence, and are willing and hoping to be challenged on it.

A few days ago I had to literally search whether Java passes array members by reference or value (it was a long day of jumping between a half dozen languages and platforms). I’m certainly fallible. Yet I am fully confident that I can quickly architect and/or build an excellent implementation of a solution to almost any problem. Because that’s what my past has demonstrated.

Generally that goes well. Every now and then, however, I’ve encountered someone who is so offended by pitch confidence that, without bothering to know a thing about me, my accomplishments, or taking me up on my open offer to demonstrate it, they respond negatively or dismissively. This seems to be particularly true among Canadians (I am, of course, a Canadian. This country has a very widely subscribed to crab mentality, however, with a “who do you think you are?” sort of natural reaction among many). Not all Canadians by any measure, but enough that it becomes notable when you regularly deal with people from other countries and start to notice that stark difference.