Facebook Instant Articles

Both Google and Facebook introduced their own lightweight HTML subsets: AMP and Instant Articles, respectively. I mentioned AMP on here previously, and via an official WordPress plugin it’s accessible by simply appending /amp on any page’s URL. Both impose a restrictive environment that limit the scope of web technologies that you can use on your page, allowing for fewer/smaller downloads and less CPU churn.

The elevator pitch for Facebook’s Instant Articles is an absolutely monster, bringing an i5-4460 to its knees by the time the page had been scrolled down. There’s a bit of an irony in the pitch for a lightweight, fast subset of HTML being a monstrous, overwrought, beastly page (the irrelevant background video thing is an overused, battery sucking pig that was never useful and is just boorish, lazy bedazzling).

I’m a user of Facebook, with my primary use being news aggregation. As many content providers all herded in line to the platform, I stopped visiting their sites and simply do a cursory browse of Facebook periodically: BBC, CBC, The Star, Anandtech, The Verge, Polygon, Cracked, various NFL related things, and on and on. On the whole I would wager that these sites engaged in a bit of a Tragedy of the Commons racing to the Facebook fold, though at some point the critical mass was hit and it became necessary to continue getting eyeballs.

The web is ghetto-ized and controlled.

More recently Facebook started corralling mobile users to their own embedded browser (for the obvious overwatch benefits). And now they’re pushing publishers to Instant Articles.

But the transition isn’t clean. Many sites are losing most embedded content (Twitter embeds, social media). Lots of pages are pulling up, curiously, malformed XML errors. It is accidentally acting as an ad blocker on many web properties, the sites unintentionally squashing their own ads, filtered out as non-Instant Article compliant.

It’s interesting how quietly this is all happening. This once would make for pretty big tech news (especially Facebook embedding the browser). Now it’s just a quiet transition.