Summer Draws To A Close

I hope those of you in the Northern Hemisphere had a glorious summer. And for those in the Southern, I hope a great summer awaits.

Now that the summer break draws to a close, it’s time to get back on projects and roll out some deliverables. Two personal projects I’ve committed to delivering in the near future are a video app — for gradual, trickle monetization1 reasons — and a multi-device contour mapping/property mapping app leveraging reference barometers, GPS and GLONASS, where available. That one is just for fun. Along with various professional things (I’m available for your projects). And I’ll start spinning up content on here.

Otherwise it’s been a period without much to talk about on here.

One of the few things really interesting over the summer has been the adoption of Kotlin as a first-class language in Android Studio 3. Kotlin is a product of JetBrains, the creators of the excellent IntelliJ IDE (which Android Studio is based upon), and it’s a language I didn’t pay attention to previously: I veer away from tools and languages that require less common dependencies when handed off to other teams, and it can be a problem during technical due diligence. Now that Kotlin is more accessible for a major platform, I finally took the dive in learning and adopting it for those projects where the JVM or similes (e.g. Android) are a part of the solution.

And it’s actually a really compelling language. The sort of fluid, intuitive programming that is similar to Go programming for me. It dramatically reduces the enormous trove of boilerplate that Java often demands.

Ultimately programming languages are largely interchangeable. Almost anything can be implemented in just about any language. The number of lines will vary, the readability fluctuate, etc, but in the end you don’t have to ever change languages. But there is something almost indescribable about languages like Go, and now Kotlin, where the implementation is so fluid with your thought process that it simply makes implementing more complex solutions effortless. I am a big fan of Go but readily acknowledge that it has an enormous litany of deficiencies, but something about it just makes great solutions appear. Other languages have great features on paper, yet seemingly nothing of consequence ever seems to be created with it. Kotlin is unique in that not only does it bring that power, it also has a pretty compelling set of modern features.

It is hardly perfect, of course: Its construction was clearly bounded by the limits of the JVM (though you can target native code and several other platforms), so it doesn’t have the greenfield benefits of something like Rust, but it is an enormous improvement over Java when I have to work in that domain.

1 – A big change in focus of my efforts is that I’m going to focus far more on sustainable recurring income (both in the hired help and built apps for monetization variety), versus “shoot for the moon” type initiatives. Technology sales are unbelievably long, drawn out, and risky, with a process that is almost impossible unless you’re willing to be personally “acquired” in the transaction, committing to moving in the process (which I am not willing to do. Short term on sites are fine, but changing countries is not). Thousands of hours and in the end the roadblocks end up being the most trivial of things, all of it distracting from other income sources. Consulting efforts have their own gamut of problems, but some recurring revenue is far better than remote odds of an occasional large jackpot.