CMOS and Rolling Shutter Artifacts / Double Precision Compute

EDIT (2017-03-01) – It’s been a bit quiet on here, but that will change soon as some hopefully compelling posts are finished. I’ve taken a couple of weeks to get into a daily fitness and relaxation routine (I would call it a meditation if that term wasn’t loaded with so much baggage), organize life better, etc. Then it’s back to 100% again with these new habits and behaviors.

While I finish up a more interesting CS-style post (SIMD in financial calculations across a variety of programming languages), just a couple of interesting news items I thought worth sharing.

In a prior entry on optical versus electronic image stabilization I noted rolling shutter artifacts –an image distortion where moving subjects or the entire frame during motion can be skewed and distorted — and their negative impact on electronic stabilization.

During video capture, especially under less than ideal conditions, it is a significant cause of distortion that often goes unnoticed until you stabilize the frames.

Sony announced a CMOS sensor with a data buffering layer that allows it to have something approximating a global shutter (Canon previously announced something similar). While their press release focuses on moving subjects in stabilized type situations, the same benefit dramatically reduces the rolling shutter skew during motion of video capture. It also offers some high speed capture options which is enticing.

Sony sensors are used by almost every mobile device now, so it’ll likely see very rapid adoption across many vendors.

EDIT: Sony is already showing off a device with a memory-layer equipped CMOS, so it’s going to become prevalent quickly.

Another bit of compelling news for the week is the upcoming release of the GP100, Pascal-based workstation GPU/compute device by nvidia (they previously released the P100 server based devices).

Double-precision calculations of upwards of 5 TeraFLOPS (for comparison a 72-core/AVX-512 Knights Landing Xeon Phi 7290 offers about 3.4 TeraFLOPS of DP performance, while any traditional processor will be some two magnitudes lower even when leveraging full SIMD such as AVX2). Traditionally these workstation cards massively compromised double precision calculations, so this update brings it into much greater utility for a wide array of uses (notably the financial and scientific world where the significant digits of single precision made it unworkable).